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“Hot Milk” by Deborah Levy

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“Hot Milk” last year’s Booker finalist Deborah Levy is an ideal prose of the poet (at home, in Britain, the author is known rather as a poet and theatrical figure): flickering, unsteady, she seemed to be collected from individual pictures. Summer, heat, sea salt, falling in love, sand adhering to the body, painful and sweet feeling of youth as uncertainty, like a space of possibilities that will soon collapse anyway, and the alarm that the moment of painful timelessness cannot be delayed forever – this is an approximate set of images and the sensations (certainly incomplete) that the book Deborah Levy generates.

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“A Spy Among Friends: Kim Philby and the Great Betrayal” by Ben Macintyre

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English historian and journalist Ben Macintyre is known mainly for the documentary novel “Operation Mincemeat”, which tells about the dizzying scam of British intelligence on the eve of the Allied landings in Normandy. In the current book of Macintyre, his rare ability to transform a large, global history into history as a literary story, and then back, not an inch without departing from the truth appears even brighter.

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“The Whole Town’s Talking” by Fannie Flagg

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Fannie Flagg is a true literary phenomenon: in fact, for many years it has been writing the same story, in which good people have a good way to do everything, both in this life and in the next. In the retelling, you cannot think out more melancholy, but in practice it is wonderful, comforting and, what is most surprising, absolutely not boring reading.

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“Into the Water” by Paula Hawkins

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The first novel by Paula Hawkins, “Girl on the Train”, was positioned as “something in the spirit of “Gone Girl” by Gillian Flynn. However, the success of “Girl on the Train” turned out to be so deafening (and perhaps even surpassed the success of Gillian Flynn) that the second Hawkins book makes no sense to camouflage for someone else – except for herself: “the new novel from the creator of” Girl on the Train “- and here you are, please, the bestseller is ready.

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“The Lost World of Byzantium” by Jonathan Harris

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British Byzantine Jonathan Harris from the very beginning takes the bull by the horns, honestly admitting that Byzantium as a state has a very bad historical reputation. Immersed in court intrigues, senseless dogmatic disputes, endless decoration of already richly decorated temples and tedious rituals, the Byzantines could neither build an effective management system, nor create a reliable army — they did not even think of a windmill.

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“The Lonely City” by Olivia Laing

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Englishwoman Olivia Laing moved to New York, falling in love with a man, but the novel turned out to be short-lived, and very quickly Laing remained in a foreign city all alone. Immersed in her own experiences, fully letting in loneliness and dissolving into it, she suddenly discovered that this state has a resource not only for self-destruction and depression, but also for productive inner work.

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“Ruler of the Night” by David Morrell

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What kind of historical characters did the writers not assign to the role of detectives: both Aristotle and Isaac Newton could catch killers. In American detectives David Morrell (the current novel is the third), the famous British Victorian writer, legendary author of “Confessions of an English Opium-Eater” Thomas De Quincey takes on the investigation of crimes.

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“Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel

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On a hot summer day, a wandering troupe called “Traveling Symphony”, specializing in classical music concerts and Shakespeare productions, slowly trudges along the sun-drenched road. The horse with difficulty pulled the wagons, and vans, screaming kids, while their parents are fixing some simple props, tune up or learn the role. One of the Actresses-in the evening she will shine in the role of Queen Titania-26-year-old Kirsten.

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“The 13th Continuum” by Jennifer Brody

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The novel Jennifer Brody is more aimed at a children’s audience, but do not take this circumstance too literally: in fact, “The 13th Continuum” is also suitable for adults – of course, provided that these adults love vigorous fiction and are tolerant to young heroes. Perhaps the age of the protagonists (they are from sixteen to twenty) is the only limitation: otherwise, the Brody book is all ages and quite universal.

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“Norse Mythology” by Neil Gaiman

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The new book by Neil Gaiman is almost a literal retelling of the Scandinavian myths, set forth in “Poetic Edda”. Therefore, if you have a general idea of how Thor differs from Odin (hint: one has a heavy hammer and a cart harnessed with two goats, and the second has a wide-brimmed hat and only one eye), from where poets get their inspiration and where Yggdrasil grows In Norse Mythology, you can hardly find anything fundamentally new.

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